Entrance

Entrance

The villa entrance is located beneath the level of the access routes, two equally graded slopes. The shallow recess is entirely clad with smooth yellow travertine. The oak door has its original brass handle ending in a black ball. Close by stands a stone bench set between two travertine cubes. The apex of the cube on the right bears a bowl with pelargoniums, which cover the aperture for sending coke down into the coal cellar. The cylindrical shade of the ceiling light is of opaque, milky glass, and it is set into a sheet brass sheath; it was made by the Prague firm of Franta Anýž & spol. to a design by Adolf Loos.

entrance niche

The corridor is arresting at first sight for the polychrome harmony of the emerald green and deep terracotta colours. The walls of the surprisingly narrow passage are clad to their full heights by large, green tinted opaque glass tiles. Earthen coloured tiles cover the floor. The harmonious colours are offset by the deep red colour used on the radiator. To the sides of the entrance are two, white painted doors. To the left of the entrance is the former reception room, where guests were received when it was not necessary for them to come into the private parts of the villa. The doors on the right lead to the service areas of the house. Along the axis of the corridor are glazed, double loose-leaf doors with glass handles, leading to the hall.

The reception room (now office and cash desk) is located to the left of the entrance. Neither the original fittings nor photographic documentation of them have survived. There is, however, written evidence for the colours of the room: the walls were purple and the furniture lacquered yellow. It is also known that on one wall there was a map of the Czechoslovak Republic. Information on the colours used in the reception room was drawn from the diary of builder Bořivoj Kriegebeck and Claire Loos's book Adolf Loos Privat, published in Vienna in 1985.
Surveys confirmed that the walls were indeed of a dark purple colour, which was restored during reconstruction. The change in the use of the room, and the fact that the furniture had not survived, permitted use of a new interior design by architect Stanislav Picek.

entrance niche

Overlay loader